I WILL REGRET THIS LATER

"When used correctly,     friendship is the most powerful weapon known to man."

Fresh out of Mackinaw Conservatory's School of Theater, Eli, Hunter, and Nick have relocated to Manhattan's Upper-Upper West Side bound by an oath that friendship shall conquer all. Amid bitchy brunches and failed one-night stands, these friends- as promising as they are promiscuous are on a quest to have their voices heard over the roar of city.When they get a chance to work in summer stock, this "family" is forced to find out the hard way what it takes to become the ultimate anything: a somebody.

Day jobs pay bills and hand jobs stroke the ego, but handling betrayal with grace is the best way to prove who is a true Lady.

The Home for Wayward Ladies made me laugh out loud, but with a lump in my throat for those funny, warm, real and delightful characters. They’re your brother, your son and your friend and it’s a treat to hear their very honest, smart voices.
— Iris Rainer Dart (Beaches)
Blaustein not only deserves applause for his quick wit and snarky exchanges that kept me laughing, he should also be praised for the deep, touching, and profound words of guidance and reflection that are sprinkled throughout the script, words from the angels (those people that unexpectedly appear in our lives when we need them). Like a good old fashioned Hollywood movie, I finished the last chapter with a smile on my face and sweet tears in my eyes. Definitely a thumbs up and a five out of five.
— J.R. Greenwell, Chelsea Station
Jeremy Scott Blaustein is a terrific writer. The story involves three good friends, a trio of young men, who come to the city to become rich and famous through show business. And so they go, with a bit of sex mixed in. This may encourage you to buy THE HOME FOR WAYWARD LADIES, but there’s no denying that Blaustein is quite the talented novelist.
— Peter Filichia
The Home for Wayward Ladies isn’t just funny. It’s laugh-out-loud, read-out-loud-to-your-friends, snort-a-cocktail-out-your-nose, lose-bladder-control kind of funny. A gem of a debut in the effervescent tradition of Patrick Dennis and Armistead Maupin
— Marc Acito (How I Paid for College)
The Home For Wayward Ladies
By Jeremy Scott Blaustein